Back to School
Support for Parents on your Child's Transition Back to School
Parenting & COVID-19
What’s Happening?
Loveparenting.ie partners across Limerick City and County run a range of parenting programmes, workshops and events throughout the year. Find information on what’s happening here.
Local Supports
Providing parenting supports and
services in your local area

The most important job in the world is…

Being a parent! Parenting is in equal parts wonderful and challenging. With the right information and support, all parents can develop their parenting skills to provide happy, safe environments for their children. They can also have fun with their children and really enjoy their time together.

 

You don’t have to do it alone – because we love parenting!

tree-motif

Being a Parent is the Most Important Job in the world

We love to hear from you

Recent Posts

Providing evidence-based information and advice

Homepage
Soothers- Take it out for talking time
Soothers- Take it out for talking timeJanuary 12, 2023Homepage Display / Learning to Talk / ToddlersSoothers can be useful as they can help to soothe your baby at bedtime or when your baby is tired or upset. Studies have shown that up until the age of 12 months, using a soother while a baby is sleeping reduces the risk of Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (also known as cot death). There are a number of disadvantages associated with the use of soothers past the age of 12 months, most of which impact upon your child’s speech and language development.  Regular and extended use of a soother past the age of 12 months can lead to: Middle ear infections (also known as otitis media): This is due to the fact that sucking opens the Eustachian tube, which is a tube that links the nose and middle ear, and this can allow bacteria into the middle ear from the nasal area. Dental problems as the soother can affect the position of the teeth as they grow. Overdevelopment of the muscles at the front of the mouth compared to those at the back of the mouth which may lead to a tongue thrust which means the tongue sticks out between the front teeth when talking. Reduced babbling and experimentation with sounds. When a baby or young child has a soother in their mouth they are less likely to copy sounds adults make or to attempt to babble and play with sounds themselves. This is important in the development of speech skills. It is important to realise that learning to talk can be tricky so toddlers need lots of practice. A soother may discourage your toddler from chatting with you, which they need to develop to learn new words and make sentences!  Advice for Parents There is a lot of confusing advice available about the use of soothers and it is important to be aware of the range of arguments. Soothers may be useful in settling young babies and encouraging strong sucking patterns, but their specific usefulness declines after the age of about six months. The increased risk of ear infections, dental problems and limiting of babbling  and use of sounds (both of which are essential in the development of speech and language skills) are all very good reasons for not giving soothers to infants after about one year of age, especially during the day and when they are interacting with other children and adults. Here are some tips to think about if your baby is using a soother: Try to wean your baby away from soothers, preferably by 12 months. Soothers prevent babies from babbling- an important step in learning to talk, so only use them at set times, like bedtime when they won’t be babbling or interacting with others. Always remove your babies soother when they are making noises, talking or playing so that they can communicate with you and their environment. When your baby cries they are trying to tell you something, try to find out what is upsetting them first or try to distract them instead of resorting to the soother. Never dip the soother in anything sweet! This leads to tooth decay. Tips on making a clean break from the soother: Choose a time when you have support for a few days (e.g. at the weekend) to throw away the soother. Most babies/toddlers will be upset for no more than two or three days. Be prepared for this and try your best to not give the soother back. Tell your family and friends what you are doing so that they don’t give your child a soother by accident. You could replace the soother with a special new toy or present. You could also give the soother to Santa or the soother Fairy and say they gave your child this present as a reward. Prepare your child for giving up the soother before it happens so that they understand where it has gone. Contributed, created and written by Little Voices Team. [...]
My child is stammering – what can I do?
My child is stammering – what can I do?January 10, 2023Homepage Display / Learning to Talk / ToddlersStammering (or stuttering) happens when children or adults have difficulty getting their words out. As a result, their speech can sound broken up and this is often called ‘disfluency’. Some kinds of disfluent speech are a completely typical part of children’s speech and language development. However, there are some types of disfluency that might signal your child has a difficulty that could lead to stammering, and it’s important to know the difference so that you can seek help from your local speech and language therapist if needed. Facts about stammering 5% of children will stammer at some point during their early years. Stammering will resolve for four out of five of those children who begin to stammer. Some of these children receive speech and language therapy, but most resolve naturally without any therapy. Stammering affects almost 1% of the population.   What does disfluency sound like? Most children have times when they might sound like they are stammering, especially if they are upset, tired, excited, if they are eager to tell you something or if something has made them angry. Your little one is still learning how to make the right sounds and put their words in the right order to make their message known, and when they are upset, their mouths can’t always keep up with their brains and their feelings!  During these times, they might not even notice that they can’t get their words out. You might hear them say the same word a few times, e.g. ‘he took my, my, my truck’ or ‘I lost – I lost – I lost my ball’. Their sentences might sound a little bit broken up, e.g. ‘My doll… my baby is gone’ or they might use lots of ‘um’ and ‘ah’ in the middle of their sentences. These moments can make your child sound very disfluent, as their sentences sound bumpy, but it’s actually a normal process and almost all children will experience it from time to time. This can happen often up until your child reaches the age of 4, but might happen less often up until the age of 6. There are other types of disfluency that sound a little different and can suggest that your child might be having a lot of difficulty getting their words out. If you hear your child getting stuck on a word, or repeating a part of a word many times e.g. ‘Mu-mu-mu-mummy’, or if they drag out a sound for a long time e.g. ‘Paaa-ss me the toy’, it would be useful to take a note of how often you hear it happening. When children are aware that their sentences and words are bumpy, they might become embarrassed and avoid speaking; you might be able to tell just by looking at them that they are having difficulty, as they might seem tense or frustrated. If you notice these behaviours in your child, we recommend you contact your local speech and language therapist for advice. How should I react when my child is disfluent? It’s difficult to know what to do as a parent when your child is disfluent and it can be quite upsetting – should you try to help them by filling in the word or finishing the sentence, or should you ask them to slow down and take their time? While this might be your first reaction, it will likely make your child feel even more frustrated. It’s usually best to wait and let them finish, and talk back to them in a slow and relaxed way, as this will naturally help them to calm down without drawing too much attention to their difficulty. It’s important that your child knows you are there to listen, even if it takes them a little longer to get the words out. Are some children more likely to stammer than others? There are certain factors that make some children more likely to stammer than others. Boys are more likely to stammer than girls, and a lot of studies have found that stammering runs in families, so if you or another family member stammer or have ever stammered, we recommend seeking advice from a speech and language therapist about your child’s disfluency. Having other speech and language difficulties, for example if your child has delayed language or advanced language skills or if they are often difficult to understand, also puts them at higher risk of stammering. If your child becomes disfluent very suddenly, or if your child has experienced a traumatic or upsetting event around the same time as they started becoming disfluent, this is something you should mention to your speech and language therapist. When should I seek further advice? You should take note of what behaviours your child shows when they are disfluent, and check with the list above to see if they are more like normal non-fluency or if they are a cause for concern. If you notice this disfluency continuing on for longer than 6 months, if it seems to be getting worse, or if your child is reacting negatively to this disfluency (e.g. becoming embarrassed/ avoiding talking etc) has any of the risk factors mentioned above, you should get in contact with a speech and language therapist. Things I can do to help my Child: Having a short (5 minutes) one-to-one time with your child on a regular basis, when you are both calm and not in a rush and you are not likely to be interrupted Thinking about your child’s general well-being, his sleeping and eating habits, his health and his pace of life Looking at your family’s conversations – are you letting each other finish what you want to say? Is anybody hogging all the talking time? Do you interrupt each other when trying to speak? Am I asking too many questions? Building your child’s confidence by focusing on what he is doing well and praising him for this. Contributed, created and written by Little Voices Team. [...]
Promoting Positive Behaviours
Promoting Positive BehavioursDecember 18, 2022Homepage Display / Middle Childhood / Pre-School Age / ToddlersBeing a parent is the most wonderful thing in the world. It certainly isn’t the easiest job but can be a very positive experience. We all need a little bit of support in our lives and some of us are more open to asking for that support than others. Nobody hands us a book of instruction when we have our babies but if you buy an item e.g. Flat-pack furniture in a shop it usually comes with an instruction book. Most of us follow those instructions and  the final product turns out ok but what happens if we don’t bother we usually end up getting cross and giving out about ‘the silly thing’. What do we do then we READ the instructions. Children are not born ‘good or bad’, they develop a range of behaviours. If a child is encouraged, guided, praised and rewarded for ‘good behaviours then we’ll see less of the ‘bad behaviours’. Children are children, not miniature adults and they think differently, understand things differently and need simple, easy and clear commands (instructions) and be encouraged and praised at every opportunity available to us. For us as adults to use positive parenting in our everyday lives we need to follow some simple, easy steps and we need to be consistent when we decide to use them. Consistency is vital when using positive parenting skills. If we try something new with our child and it doesn’t work first or second time we need to keep working at it. We need to use praise, rewards and positive communication. Most of us only see the ‘bad behaviour’ and give the child negative attention for that behaviour when what we need to do is look out for the ‘good behaviours’(catching the child being good) and praise and reward the child accordingly. We need to set good example to our children as children will model (copy) what they see. If we are shouting at our child well then the child will shout back at us. And nobody likes to be shouted at. Staying calm can help us to stay in control and as parents we need to be in control as we are the adults. We need to set limits, have boundaries, rules and routines in our daily lives. Every where we and our children go will have these in place so we are preparing them for life in doing so. Positive reinforcement works, and also helps foster independence, life skills and self-esteem. Isn’t this what we want for our children, for them to turn into independent adults with life skills and good self-esteem? As they say ‘prevention is better then the cure’ and if we use positive parenting then we will see more of the ‘good’ behaviours in our children. Provided by Community Mothers Programme, Limerick Social Service Council. [...]
The Importance of Attachment
The Importance of AttachmentDecember 6, 2022Homepage Display / Infants & Babies / ToddlersBuilding Brains – The Importance of Attachment in the first few years When we talk about children and babies the word ‘attachment’ is often misunderstood. There is an almost hippie legacy, where images of a baby literally attached to a parent with a homemade papoose spring to mind. The reality, however, is very different. Attachment simply means the bond that you create with your baby, even before they are born. It is the bond that helps your child to grow and develop, and it shapes their thoughts, memories, emotions, expectations and behaviours. For babies, it’s all of the things that you already do. The laughing, kissing, pulling faces, and the games of ‘peekaboo’ that are met with constant surprise and delight from your captive little audience. These moments don’t have to be planned and they don’t need equipment or toys. Take nappy-changing, for example. This is an interaction that happens many times a day with your child over an average 2 ½ to 3 year period. It could be a purely functional activity where you lie your baby down, swap a clean nappy for a soiled one and worry about what chores are yet to be done. Or, it could be a positive interaction with your baby that you both enjoy, where you can tickle her toes, blow on her belly or sing her a song. Those small things are teaching her to understand and reciprocate emotions, and assuring her that she is safe and loved. It provides what psychologists call her ‘secure base’. For your toddler, it can be as simple as explaining to them that when you leave them at crèche or with a caregiver, you will be coming back for them.  She has now learnt about expectations so she knows that you are coming back but a little reassurance removes any fear that she may have. The absence of fear is one of the most important factors in attachment. Sometimes what we see as simple chatter with children is actually the most important kind of security blanket that we can offer. As children get older, it’s about keeping that communication ongoing, involving them in decision-making and taking an interest in how their day has been. While this can become a little more difficult during the teenage years, it is very important. Amid raging hormones, school pressures and the general ups and downs of growing up, one of the most valuable assets that your child has is the security in their relationship with you. Knowing that they can come to you with anything is a return on the investment that you made at the very beginning of their lives. Every child is different but their needs are universal. To nurture your child so that they feel loved and secure is the most important gift that you can give. While it can often lose its way in between toddler tantrums and teenage silences, it is – and will always be – there.   [...]
Tips for Choosing Childcare
Tips for Choosing ChildcareAugust 15, 2022Infants & Babies / ToddlersChoosing Childcare is a decision that faces most parents at some point in their parenting journey. It often involves trying to balance the parents’ need for childcare with that of their child. Considerations for parents can include: Practical issues Is it affordable? Paid childcare in Ireland is expensive relative to other European countries. Costs vary considerably between services. You may be required to pay for days you child does not attend (due to holidays or illness). Additionally you may be required to pay for days the service is not open (e.g. bank holidays). To avoid any misunderstandings it is important to clarify the fee policy before taking up a place in the childcare service. Subsidised childcare may be available for parents with social welfare entitlements and/or attending certain education/training courses. Is it accessible? Do the opening hours fit with my other commitments (e.g. work, study, school)? If my child is unwell can he/she still attend or will I need to make alternative arrangements? Is there a waiting list – if so how are places allocated? If my child has additional needs will the service make the necessary provision to accommodate these needs? Emotional issues Do I trust the childcare service I have chosen? Are the staff approachable? Before deciding on a childcare service, it is worth asking to see a copy of the most recent inspection report for the childcare service. The reports are also available online: Map Can I avoid obligations/pay back to relatives/friends? Will I be expected to volunteer/fundraise on behalf of the childcare service? Can I avoid the ‘competing mother’? Many parents worry that children will show a preference for childcare practitioner – the relationship between the parent and child is unique, no other relationship can replace that. The childcare practitioner creates the emotional climate and environment around the child in their care – as such it is important that you as the parent should like and respect the practitioner. Group- is it socially desirable? Is the service rooted in the community – does it share my priorities and values? Does the childcare service purport to ensure access to particular national schools – if so please check the admissions policy of the national school. Meeting the Child’s needs Children have emotional, developmental and group needs that high quality childcare can support. Emotional – children require a secure emotional bond with caregiver. This bond is one of the most important building blocks for good emotional well-being and mental health in later life and as such it should be good enough. Children should be afforded the opportunity to get to know their carer well – frequent changes in staffing are to be avoided. Developmental needs – early years care and education provides a wonderful opportunity for children to explore a new part of their world, negotiate new challenges and make connections between what is known and new knowledge. The childcare setting can influence how that child thinks and what they think about. The child should be offered educational and developmental opportunities that are appropriate to his/her age and stage of development. Children learn through their senses, by doing, by playing, using language and feeling secure and loved. Group needs – making the transition from the home environment is an important opportunity for the child to learn about social acceptance. The chosen childcare setting should be reflective and respective of the ethnicity and culture of the child. Children learn to be part of a group and it is through this group that meaning making occurs. Awareness of and prioritising these needs can help to make the childcare choices easier. Advice and support about local childcare options is available by contacting: Limerick Childcare Committee on 061 600918 Email: info@limerickchildcare.ie [...]
Exam Worries
Exam WorriesMay 6, 2022Homepage Display / TeenagersMany students have underlying worries approaching their exams, regardless of their academic capabilities. No matter how big or small, all exam worries can affect a student’s exam performance and overall well-being. These worries can also appear in various disguises including lashing out, negative self-talk, unexplained physical ailments, or going from a diligent to an indifferent student overnight. For parents, exam season can be difficult to navigate and cultivates a mixed sense of protectiveness and powerlessness. However, a parent’s support during exam season is imperative. Emphatically listening to your child’s worries without dismissing any (no matter how irrational they seem) can help ease much stress. This non-judgmental listening ear gives your child the opportunity to express their underlying worries in a healthy way. Try opening up conversations when you are shoulder-to-shoulder rather than face-to-face to help them feel more comfortable and less exposed or interrogated. They may not want to share their worries with you immediately, but will know that you are willing to listen when they are ready. Under the pressures that accompany exams, thought patterns can often go askew and lead to irrational thoughts predicting worst-case scenarios or backing an “all or nothing” mindset. As parents witnessing this you can take the role of acknowledging the thoughts of your child while also letting them know that you believe the opposite to be true. Remind your child of how strong they are and help them recall a time or situation when they came through, managed, survived a similarly anxious time. This will help support your child in coming up with a more balanced way of thinking. During exam time, there is an apparent shift in values. Many children will begin to measure their own self-worth on exam performance, or by comparing themselves to siblings, peers, or others around them. As a parent, remind your child of their individual intrinsic qualities, which truly represent who they are (caring, humorous, creative, etc.) and avoid adding to the comparison dialogue with examples of how well others handled a similar experience. Most importantly, let your child know that no matter what the outcome, you will be able to deal with it together and that you accept them regardless of their academic achievements. Exam season can be physically, mentally, and emotionally energy zapping, with study demands often placing a healthy lifestyle balance by the wayside. However, maintaining a healthy balance will benefit your child hugely. Keeping a balanced diet, drinking enough water, engaging in regular physical activity, getting a good night’s sleep and preserving time for enjoyable interests is essential. Now, before the exam stress commences, is also an ideal time to encourage your child to begin practising some relaxation techniques or mindfulness exercises. Practising these skills now will allow your child to readily draw on them as a healthy coping mechanism during unhelpful exam stress. A healthy level of stress naturally improves motivation and exam focus, and all of the above will help keep these stress levels at this optimal level. Top Tips Support your child in challenging their worries First acknowledge the worries your child is having. Then support them in coming up with a more balanced way of thinking about these worries. An example might be changing “I’m going to fail!” to “I’ve passed a hard exam before, I can do it again”. It might also help if your child writes this balanced thought down for future reference. Set miniature goals Help your child breakdown their overwhelming workload into smaller, more manageable steps ahead of their exam. Celebrate effort Take every opportunity to celebrate the effort your child is putting in to prepare. After an exam, avoid immediately asking what grade they obtained and instead ask a more open question about how they found the experience. Good enough is good enough! Try to adopt this mantra in your household. Your child will be feeling pressure from all angles and it is important that you try not to add to this overwhelming feeling. Notice your expectations and whether these are adding additional pressure. Balance is key Help your child to maintain a healthy life balance during this busy time. This includes diet, water intake, relaxation, social engagement, and preserving time to do the things they love. Look after yourself Be sure not to forget about your own wellbeing during this overwhelming period.  Modelling a healthy life balance will also benefit your child.  As they say “you can’t pour from an empty cup!” This article was written by HSE Primary Care Child and Family Psychology Services, a member of Parenting Limerick. Parenting Limerick is a network of parenting and family support organisations.  [...]
Encouraging Positive Behaviour
Encouraging Positive BehaviourApril 28, 2022Homepage Display / Middle ChildhoodWe’ve all been there—it’s the end of a long day and we know that what everyone in the family needs is to be tucked up in bed. Getting there, however, can seem like the a never ending journey. There’s finding the right pair of pyjamas, ensuring the teeth are brushed, scrambling to find the lost tie and the stuffed animal that hasn’t been played with in two months but is suddenly essential, a final drink of water, stories, hugs, another final drink of water and then, as you settle onto the couch for the first time that evening, “Daaaad, I need you…” It’s at this stage that even the most patient among us is tempted to shout up the stairs, “JUST GO TO BED!!” The most patient and the less patient will realise, however, that this very rarely works. Getting our child to listen and to behave positively can be one of the most challenging parts of parenting. One of the best ways to change unwanted behaviour is to pay attention to and reward the behaviours you want. The most powerful re­ward is praise, which is a social reward. Another social reward is spending time with your child. Other effective rewards are privileges (like T.V. and gaming time, special outings, extra bedtime stories, time with friends) and material rewards such as money, toys, treats, or a Driver’s License. Below are some ideas on how to establish a reward system with your child. CHOOSE the behaviour you want your child to do and write it down. Begin with a behaviour that is not too hard to achieve. You can then tackle more difficult behaviours. (If you want your child to stop doing a negative behaviour, decide what its opposite is; that becomes the behaviour goal.) PRACTICE: Break down the new behaviour into small doable steps you can teach your child and have him or her practice the behaviour. Decide on the how the behaviour will be measured—how your child knows he or she has accomplished it. REWARD: Decide what reward your child likes and how it will be earned (number of points required, etc.). Have the rewards on hand. CHART: Let your child choose a tracking chart. Fill it out and be clear about what your child must do to earn a move on the chart and receive a reward. REWARD: Put the chart in a place where they will be easily seen. Be interested and enthusiastic when your child marks the chart. PRAISE: Praise your child every time you see him/her doing the new behaviour and have him/her note it on the chart. When choosing rewards, make sure children find the rewards enticing—let them help decide the reward. Some rewards can be small for smaller achievements and some can be larger for significant progress. Make sure the rewards are on-hand and easy to give. Chil­dren earn points to receive rewards by practicing the desired behaviour, setting up a tracking chart, and daily doing the behaviour. This article was adapted from the Strengthening Families Programme. Parenting Limerick is a network of parenting and family support organisations. [...]
Toddler Tantrums and the Growing Brain
Toddler Tantrums and the Growing BrainApril 22, 2022Homepage Display / ToddlersChildren are amazing!  We watch them grow from tiny infants to curious toddlers running around everywhere, asking endless questions, and learning to push boundaries. For parents and carers, managing challenging behaviour is often daunting. But brain science can help! Today, we know a lot more about baby and toddler brains than we did 20 years ago. By age 3, brains are almost fully grown in size. Yet children at this age still struggle with sharing, waiting, or understanding words like “no” or “later.” It’s because that part of the toddler brain is not fully developed yet! We don’t expect children to be born knowing how to operate a washing machine – learning to cope with big emotions is much the same. Experiences and the outside environment affect babies’ brain development. In the first five years of life, the brain grows from the size of a walnut to a grapefruit!  Neural pathways are building with astonishing speed.  Loving care shapes brain structure – it creates strong brain connections that become permanent. Playful talking, turn taking, singing, gentle touch and friendly faces stimulate the release of oxytocin, “the cuddle hormone.” This helps your little one feel safe and secure. You can’t really spoil your child with too much love! When children experience stress frequently in the early years it can cause problems in later life. Ongoing exposure to cortisol, the stress hormone, can affect developing brains. It’s like central heating that cannot be turned off. Little brains become programmed to expect stress, making it more difficult for children to cope with challenging situations.  A soothing touch and calming word give toddlers the security they need when they are having a tough time. When toddlers have a tantrum, it’s a sign that they are feeling big feelings, and are struggling to control them. Knowing this, we can see why some behaviour management strategies don’t always work.  Hoping that a child would sit still for a long time or say a heartfelt “sorry” might be expecting too much! Trying to be with your toddler during a tantrum, staying calm and naming their feelings for them will help them recover much quicker. It will also help keep your relationship strong and secure. Remember, parenting is all about being good enough. There is no such thing as a perfect parent!  Simply spending time together, playing and laughing with your child and learning to read their needs will help their brain grow. Soon, your little one will be off as a confident little explorer! If want advice regarding your child’s development, or if you are feeling overwhelmed as a parent, talk to your public health nurse or doctor. Top tips -The 5 R’s for healthy brain development     Relationships Babies and toddlers need you! Getting to know what your baby /toddler likes & dislikes, their little personality helps build strong bonds – watch wait and wonder what can your little one do, delight in all they can do! Responsive interactions Following your baby’s lead – what are they looking at – interested in? Babies learn through all their senses, slowing down and taking time to look with baby at what is in their environment helps their brain to grow.  Chat to your baby, wait and give them a chance to babble back. Babies are born social and love to gaze and gurgle at you while snuggled up close. Toddlers love when you play with them and join in their little games and chat. Respect Your baby / toddler is a unique and special little person. They need you to understand what they can do, and they need you to praise and encourage their efforts. Tantrum behaviour is not personal or a reflection on you as a parent—it’s a normal part of a toddler’s development.  By providing support and love while your toddler is feeling out of control shows them respect and tells them they are important. This will help them learn to manage their feelings.  Routines Routines offer security and safety. Young children do best when they know what is happening and what will come next. Try using everyday care routines (nappy changing, dinner time, bedtime stories) as opportunities to bond with your child. Remember that routines are best when they are flexible as baby and toddler’s needs change as they grow. Little ones can cope with change with your help and love. Repetition  Babies and young children love repetition. You can provide a playful and stimulating environment by playing simple games such as peekaboo, sharing favourite books over and over again, messy play for toddlers and getting outside. These all help grow healthy brains and bonds. Just 15 minutes  play a day makes a big difference! This article was contributed by ABC Start Right, an early intervention project and member of Parenting Limerick. Parenting Limerick is a network of parenting and family support organisations.  [...]
Top Tips for Messy Play
Top Tips for Messy PlayApril 7, 2022playMessy play doesn’t have to be expensive. Standard kitchen cupboard items such as dried pasta, rice, dried beans and pulses, split peas or porridge oats are an easy way to start on messy play – however, parental supervision will be required. Old wooden spoons, colanders, plastic cups and bowls make great tools to explore these new materials. Older children will enjoy glitter, sequins, scented essential oils or food colouring. Parents who work in an office can use the leftovers from the shredding bin, and hide small objects among the paper. Get more adventurous: cooked and dyed pasta, whipped cream, home-made play dough, shaving foam, gloop (semi-solid mixture of water and cornflour) and slime are all great for messy play. Easy to follow recipes can be found online. Outdoor play is messy play: make mud pies and potions, jump in puddles, collect leaves and plant flowers. Ignore the gardening gloves – let your child feel the world and the earth around them. Theming messy play around holidays or calendar events. Dye dried rice yellow at Easter time, or hide small plastic or chocolate eggs amongst the rice. For a Christmas theme, use red glitter slime, or green and red dyed cooked pasta. Freeze left over beans or pasta in a little water, and let your child engage with colder objects and watch the ice melt. Setting limits: Messy play, as the name suggests, can get messy! Oil clothes are a great way to contain messy play activities. Work with your child to set boundaries. Learning to tolerate and accept limits during messy play can be a fun experience for you both! [...]
Talking to Your Teenager about Safe Sex
Talking to Your Teenager about Safe SexApril 7, 2022Homepage Display / TeenagersFor some parents, talking to children about sex, sexual relationships and sexuality can be challenging. We may not have had the best sex education ourselves, so we might be unsure what to say and how to say it. We might also be unsure if we have all of our own facts straight or if we might even be encouraging our children to have sex early if we are too open about the subject. In addition, many young people are overexposed to pornography so we may think they know more than we do. This isn’t the case, though, and young people still need information and support from the caring, responsible adults in their lives. The evidence tells us that young people who have parents who communicate openly and honestly about all issues sex-related tend to make more positive, less risky choices. And, when they do make mistakes, they are more likely to find the help and support they need. Part of these conversations need to include how to keep themselves and their potential partners safe from sexually transmitted diseases and unwanted pregnancies. Below are some tips on how to get the conversation started. If you can, start the conversation early in an age appropriate way. Young children are naturally curious about their bodies so name their parts for them and answer any questions they have in simple language. You don’t have to go in to details, but try not to let them feel any shame or embarrassment in asking the questions. Get your own facts straight. There is lots of information out there about sex and contraception, so take some time to update your own knowledge. Have a look at sexualwellbeing.ie to find evidence-based information and support. Find out what resources are available locally (their GP, the Family Planning Clinic, the STI Clinic in University Hospital Limerick.) You don’t need to know everything, but try to show a willingness to help your son or daughter find the information they need If they do ask for support in accessing birth control, stay calm and talk to them openly. Help them access appropriate medical advice. Let them know you are there to help them think through the best, safest option for them Try not to have “The Big Talk”. Instead, have regular, casual conversations as issues arise. If you are watching something together or if your son or daughter tells you something that happened to a friend, ask him or her open questions about what they think and share your own thoughts. If, for example, they tell you that one of their friends is dealing with an unplanned pregnancy, you can ask them if they are concerned that this might happen to them. This will help them to see that you are not afraid to talk about these subjects and that you want to communicate with them. Remember that talking about sex with your son or daughter, including how to use and access contraception, doesn’t meant that you are actively encouraging them to have sex. Talk to them about contraception in the context of positive, consensual relationships and make sure they know they have options, including to not have sex until they are ready. This article was contributed by a member of Parenting Limerick. Parenting Limerick is a network of parenting and family support organisations. [...]
Sleep Tight – Getting Baby to Sleep Better
Sleep Tight – Getting Baby to Sleep BetterMarch 31, 2022Homepage Display / Infants & Babies / ToddlersAny conversation with any new parent will always involve the topic of sleep (or lack of it). It takes a while for babies to get into a routine but with a bit of patience and perseverance you will manage. Here are some helpful hints on getting your baby to sleep better:  Develop a bedtime routine as soon as possible so that your baby begins to learn the difference between day-time and night-time. An example might be: a bath, fresh nappy and sleep clothes, feed/supper, story and cuddle-time, bed. Try to quieten things down before bed-time, perhaps turn off the TV or any loud music. This may help your baby begin to relax. Older children can be encouraged to do something quiet that does not involve rushing around. Your baby will link certain things with going to sleep. If you always place your child in his/her cot to go to sleep, this is how they will learn to sleep there comfortably. If you usually rock your baby to sleep, push them in the buggy, or take them in to your bed to get them to sleep, they may always need these things to be done before they will sleep. So choose carefully. If your baby wakes often in the night, try to soothe him/her without taking her out of his/her cot. If he/she is very upset and you think she needs a cuddle, do this quietly and place her back in the cot as soon as she has settled. As children reach toddler stage they still need 11-12 hours sleep at night, so bed-times should allow them to get this amount. Try to get some sleep or relaxing time when the baby sleeps. Your priority is to care for your baby, so do not hesitate to ask your partner, family and friends to give you a hand with everything else (especially in the early stages). Stay calm. If you feel stressed or if you are finding it hard to cope, talk to someone you trust who has done it before or your public health nurse, GP or support worker.  Produced by TREOIR, The National Information Service for Unmarried Parents, visit www.treoir.ie for more information. [...]
The importance of sleep
The importance of sleepMarch 31, 2022Homepage Display / Infants & BabiesSleep difficulties in children are very common problems for families. It is very normal for a child to have some aspect of sleep disturbances in their lives. Sleep is the foundation for positive physical, mental, and emotional health. Sometimes it can be more apparent when children are getting too little sleep rather than the right amount of sleep. Typically, we can recognise when a child or teenager has not gotten enough sleep if they appear excessively sleepy during the day, irritable, not as alert as usual, or unable to concentrate fully. We are less able to recognise that a child who seems hyperactive may be exhausted. For many children, when they are not getting enough sleep, their body produces hormones (cortisol and adrenaline) in an effort to try and keep them awake. This in turn gives the impression that children have lots of energy and are not in need of rest.   It can be difficult to know how much sleep is sufficient sleep; different people have different sleep needs. Lack of sleep is considered a problem when: a child is obtaining less sleep than is needed for normal growth and development; a child’s emotional and psychological health is affected; if there is an impact on a child’s immune system; and/or if it affects the wider family. There are many practical reasons why a child or teenager may wake during the night or find it difficult to fall asleep, such as illness, hunger, excitement, being too hot or too cold, bad dreams, or needing to go to the toilet. Worrying thoughts occurring in a child’s mind when they are trying to get to sleep or waking them up at night are also very common reasons for sleep difficulties. If your child is finding it difficult to sleep due to worries it may be useful to encourage them to find some way of letting their worries out before bedtime. Depending on the age of your child this might mean writing them down or having allocated ‘worry time’ for 15 minutes. Another useful strategy for children who find it difficult to sleep due to worries includes breathing exercises. For younger children this can be in the form of ‘belly breathing’ or teenagers may try it in the form of mindfulness. Screen time (phones, tablets, TV, etc.) is one of the biggest issues that prevents us from falling asleep easily. The bright light on the screen stimulates our brain and makes us more awake rather than sleepy. We also know that the blue light emitted from our devices supresses melatonin which is the chemical that regulates sleep and wakefulness. Similarly, the videos or TV programmes that we watch can make us more alert by stimulating and distracting our brain. It is best to stop all screen time one-two hours before bedtime so that our brains have a chance to wind down and prepare for sleep. All stimulating activities such as, screen time, energetic games should be eliminated before bedtime and replaced with calming activities such as, bath time, lullabies, or reading relaxing stories. Top tips for a good nights’ sleep ‘Sleep hygiene’ refers to practicing habits and strategies which promote sleep and improve sleep problems.  Poor sleep hygiene is usually indicated by frequent sleep disturbances, daytime sleepiness, and taking too long to fall asleep. Making a few simple changes can hugely benefit your child’s quality of sleep. Consistency Consistent bedtime routines are a proven strategy to decrease anxieties surrounding bedtime.  It is important to stick to the same bedtime and wake time every day, even on weekends. Your child should have a predictable series of events which lead up to bedtime. Bedtime routines should be calm and relaxed, as opposed to rushed. Beds are for sleeping If your child has difficulty falling asleep, they should try getting out of bed and engaging in a calming activity, such as reading a book. As a child tosses and turns in bed more, their negative associations with bedtime can increase. Bedrooms should be kept solely for sleeping so try to avoid sending your child to their bedroom as a punishment or allowing them to complete their homework in their room as they develop negative associations. Good sleep environment Children should have a sleep environment which is consistent, comfortable, and quiet.  A relaxed and calm environment is essential for falling asleep easily. A child’s bedroom should be cool, quiet, and comfortable. Sunlight should be blocked out in order to help children fall asleep easily. No screen time Screens are proven to interfere with falling asleep easily. Children should stop all screen time one-two hours before bed. This article was written by HSE Primary Care Child and Family Psychology Services, a member of Parenting Limerick. Parenting Limerick is a network of parenting and family support organisations. [...]
Communication in Conflict
Communication in ConflictMarch 24, 2022Homepage Display / TeenagersImagine your older child or teenager arrives home two hours later than you had agreed. How do you feel? How do you respond? When we are angry, we might snap and raise our voice, which can cause unnecessary distress in relationships. When we are sad, we might tend to avoid “that” conversation, thus letting strong feelings and tension develop. Here are four steps to more effective communication with older children and adolescents. Focus on the Problem: We’ve all been there: we get swept up in the upset and we lose focus. Suddenly, it’s not just about coming home late. It’s also about that permanently untidy bedroom, or the time your child fought with their sibling a few days ago. When we are feeling annoyed and frustrated, these other issues may come to mind. However, bringing these issues into the conversation makes us look like we are on the attack. Instead, try focussing on the one problem at a time. It is a more effective way for you and your child to problem solve the issue together. Know When to Take Time Out When it comes to timeouts, we tend to think they are only for children. But stepping away from an escalating conflict is also a very effective tool for parents. It allows you to ground yourself, think more clearly and focus on solving the problem, instead of yielding to strong emotions which may cloud your ability to problem solve. For example, you can say, “I am feeling very angry at the moment and think it would be a good idea to take a break. We can continue this when we are both feeling calmer”. Alternatively, you could introduce a code word to express this that both you and your young person understand. It is important to remember that a time out is not avoiding the conflict. Both you and your child should return to the discussion when the big feelings subside and you have considered the situation calmly. Talking things through calmly can lead to a healthier solution, and avoid the added stress of arguing. Reflective Listening: Reflective listening is when you hear and interpret what the other person has said, and reflect it back to them in your own words. For example, “so what you’re saying is, you are late coming home because you missed the bus” or “so what I am hearing is that you don’t care that we had agreed a curfew for you tonight”. Reflective listening is a very helpful way to check you clearly understand the other person’s viewpoint, instead of focusing on what you are going to say next. Conflict can be resolved more effectively when both people are listening to each other. Also, the other person can clarify what they are intending to say and feel heard and understood.  Use “I” Statements: Blame is a tricky pattern during a disagreement. We point out behaviours or characteristics that we do not think are helpful and we blame the person for how they make us feel. For example, “you are always late and you never care about the rules”. This can feel like an accusation and is likely to make your child feel defensive. An “I” statement would be: “I feel angry when you come home later than agreed”. Here, we are sharing our feelings and taking responsibility for them ourselves, while also explaining what has triggered this feeling. As a final thought, consider that problem solving is a shared responsibility. If we are really mad, doing all of the talking and not listening, we are not doing our part in problem solving. But if we are calm, listening carefully and expressing how we feel without blame, it is more difficult for someone to escalate a disagreement. These are very healthy skills to model to our young people as they grow up and experience their own conflicts and interpersonal challenges. Top Tips for Helping your Teen Stay Healthy Provide Lots of Healthy Food and Snacks. Many teenagers have voracious appetites-it may feel like a full time job keeping them fed. If you have lots of filling, healthy snacks on hand (think fruit, cut up vegetables, hummus and pita, wholegrain bagels and peanut butter, wholegrain pasta with tomato sauce), they will be more likely to reach for these than fill up on junk Get Active Together. If your teens see you leading a healthy, active lifestyle, they will be more likely to follow suit. Ask your teen to join you on an evening walk—they might surprise you and actually come, and this can be a great way to connect Communicate and Share Information. Many parents find it challenging to discuss some issues, such as sex and drug and alcohol misuse, with their teens. The reality is that teens who can communicate openly and honestly with their parents about these issues tend to make better, healthier choices. So, get in the habit of talking about these issues openly and honestly. Help Them Build Resilience. Teenagers are under a lot of pressure from school, friends, social media, etc., and many teenagers are struggling with mental health issues such as anxiety and depression. Developing positive coping strategies can help teenagers manage these pressures and improve their overall well-being. Explore things like exercise, diet, meditation, yoga, breathing, mindfulness, etc. with your child and help them find a strategy that works for them. This article was written by HSE Primary Care Child and Family Psychology Services, a member of Parenting Limerick. Parenting Limerick is a network of parenting and family support organisations.    [...]
St. Patrick’s Day Parade; Enjoy all of the pageantry and none of the drama
St. Patrick’s Day Parade; Enjoy all of the pageantry and none of the dramaMarch 17, 2022Homepage Display / Quality TimeIn Ireland, the St. Patrick’s Day parade is imprinted as deeply on our memories of childhood festivities and celebrations almost as much as Christmas. Whether we had to wear tri-colour jumpers knitted by our grannies or proudly display our harp badges, there was an inevitable excitement about the parade. Having a day off school also lent a certain positivity to the day. Like all holidays, St. Patrick’s Day seems to get bigger every year, particularly among advertisers. Most of the high street shops sell green, shamrock-covered clothes and accessories and certain fast food chains bring out a green milkshake for its annual appearance. The parade then becomes more about the buying than the celebration, material things over experiences. So this year, as parents, let’s make an effort to really make the day a family event that will generate happy memories for years to come. In the lead up to the day, you could encourage your child to make her own banner, flag or t-shirt. In addition to being an activity that you can both enjoy together, it will also teach your child that things don’t always have to be disposable. Sure, they could buy a flag at the parade- which will probably be binned pretty soon afterwards- or you sew or paint one together that could be displayed somewhere at home later. It also provides a lesson on recycling, which is ‘going green’ in its truest sense! The City Centre becomes incredibly crowded on St. Patrick’s Day, which can cause a little anxiety. With younger children, you could turn the annoyance of picking your viewing spot into a game. For example, agree beforehand that you will turn left every time you see someone with dyed green hair and see where you end up. They’ll be happily distracted and you can move through a crowd quicker. Keep safety in mind as well. With older children, agree ‘safe spots’ in advance so, in the event of being separated, you all go immediately to that spot. Fast food restaurants tend to be over-crowded after the parade, with long queues and waiting times. If you prepare a small picnic that morning, you can head to one of the city centre parks, sit on your homemade flags and enjoy a hassle-free and healthier lunch. Your own green smoothies or milkshakes will taste a lot better when you haven’t had to stand in line for an hour to get them! This article was contributed by a member of Parenting Limerick. Parenting Limerick is a network of parenting and family support organisations.    [...]
Talking to Children about War
Talking to Children about WarMarch 10, 2022Home Life / Homepage DisplayLast week our colleagues in Barnardos published this article on their website. We think it offers great guidance for parents and carers. With news of the war in Ukraine dominating headlines, social media platforms and conversations across the country, many children are likely to have been exposed to information about the conflict. Children do not always talk about what is worrying them but they may be trying to make sense of this information by themselves and, in the absence of factual information, imagining situations to be far worse than they are. Every child is different and while some might be scared, others may not be worried at all. Below are some strategies for talking to children about the current situation that will help to ease their concerns. Keep calm. Check in with yourself and how are you currently feeling. When you are feeling anxious children can notice this and begin to feel stressed too. If needed, take some time to calm. Talk to children. We instinctively want to protect children from things that might frighten them; however not talking about something can make children more scared. If children are already talking about the war, encourage them to tell you what they have heard and ask them how they are feeling. If children are showing no interest, leave them be. Answer questions. Answer children’s questions in language they will understand with a level of information appropriate to their age. Avoid sharing too much information as this can be overwhelming. If you do not have all the answers, that is ok. Tell the child you will let them know when you know. Create a safe environment. Children need to feel safe and secure. Limit children’s exposure to news reports and discuss your own worries outside of children’s earshot.  Reassure them. Young children often personalise situations and may perceive the danger to be closer to home. Let them know that although war is very serious, they do not need to worry about it happening in their neighbourhood. Tell them you understand how they are feeling and reassure them that they are safe and that you are there to take care of them. It is important, however, to be realistic and not promise that no one will get hurt. Help children find ways to express themselves. Some children may not be able to talk about their thoughts or feelings but can be supported to make sense of the world through play.  Do something positive. Encourage children to engage in activities where they can feel helpful such as drawing pictures to send to children who are living in affected areas.  Avoid stereotyping groups of people by nationality and challenge hateful talk. Partner with parents. Share information on the discussions children are having at home and in the setting or any fears or concerns the child may have. Children who have experienced trauma or loss may be particularly vulnerable to news of war and conflict and may need extra support.  Children with relatives in the regions impacted by conflict will also need special attention. This article was contributed by Barnardos, a member of Parenting Limerick. For more information go to www.barnardos.ie. Parenting Limerick is a network of parenting and family support organisations.           [...]
Top Tips for Managing Toddler Behaviour
Top Tips for Managing Toddler BehaviourMarch 3, 2022Homepage Display / ToddlersToddlers are amazing. They are curious, lovable and always want to know “why?” They are beginning to make sense of themselves in the world and want to explore everything. Many have little sense of danger and don’t like waiting for anything .They are not able to manage their emotions themselves yet.   Temper tantrums are common and parents often find it difficult to cope when their toddler becomes overwhelmed with emotion. Below are some tips on how to manage these situations. Toddlers hear “No “or “don’t” a lot. Try to offer choice when possible –“blue shoes or wellies today?” Behaviour such as crying, screaming, biting or breath holding is your toddler trying to tell you they can’t cope. They are not doing it because they are naughty or bold Young children’s brains are not fully developed. They become overwhelmed very easily. Remaining calm yourself, staying close to your toddler, speaking gently and offering comfort help your toddler to recover more quickly Try to spot a tantrum coming on – hunger, boredom and tiredness are key triggers. Try to distract your child by offering to play with them or using humour such a silly voice, walk or face. Describe your child’s emotions to them. Say things like, “Playing with that puppy makes you very happy” or “I know you feel angry and frustrated that you we have to leave the park, but we’ll come back on Friday.” This will help them to put words to their feelings and help them to recognise their emotions Try to stay calm during a tantrum even if people are watching. It is not a reflection on you as a parent- they have probably been there too! Talk to a friend or think about joining a baby and toddler group. Chatting to other parents with toddlers can help you survive and enjoy the toddler years. Talk to your PHN, Creche staff or GP if you are worried about your child’s behaviour.   [...]
World Book Day: Celebrate stories, Love reading. Books, Brains and Bonding
World Book Day: Celebrate stories, Love reading. Books, Brains and BondingMarch 3, 2022Communication / Homepage DisplayIreland is celebrating World Book Day on Thursday 3rd March. It seems there is always a day to celebrate these days, but this is one of the highlights of the year. Books should be like toys:  a reward, exciting and something fun! It’s never too early to start reading to your child. You can start from the minute they are born (even before if you like). Make it part of your daily routine, like a book before bed or after a nappy change. They may not understand the words yet but it’s the sound of your voice that is their favourite thing in the world. Babies are born learning. From birth to five years they will learn more words and language than at any other time in their lives.  Research shows that book reading actively promotes language development. It’s not just about reading the text. It’s also about the parent child bonding and interaction that takes place, which fosters all learning. Book reading naturally allows for cuddles and bonding, allowing your baby to feel safe and loved. Reading to babies and children is special time which stimulates their imagination, builds their language, improves their listening skills and helps them understand the world around them. So next time you sit down to read to a baby, toddler or child, turn off the TV and have some quiet time together. Remember you are building your child’s brain. For babies, choose simple board books. Tactile or touchy feely books are best. Babies like to explore with their hands and their mouths so these books help their language learning for example: “It feels bumpy….I hear the word bumpy…oh this is what bumpy feels like”. Allow your baby to play with the book. They may not be interested in looking at it, but they may want to put on their head, turn the pages at speed or simply chew on it. It might seem pointless but all of these things are good for later reading and love of books. For toddlers, it’s all about the predictability and repetition. They develop strong preferences for certain books. These books bring comfort, bonding and familiarity.  Children love to have their favourite books read over and over again. Reading it to them is doing something amazing. It’s embedding the neural pathways in the brain that will help your child learn new vocabulary. Learning new vocabulary is a key skill in learning how to read when they go to school. Repetitive books and nursery rhymes have predictable, rhymical language that catches toddler’s interest and makes it easier for them to remember key words. You’re never too old, too wacky, too wild to pick up a book and read to a child. This article was contributed by a member of Parenting Limerick. Parenting Limerick is a network of parenting and family support organisations.  [...]
Celebrating Foster Carers
Celebrating Foster CarersFebruary 24, 2022Home Life / Homepage DisplayThis week is National Foster Care Week – a celebration of foster carers and children who live in foster families. Foster carers often carry out a more challenging but equally rewarding role when they parent a child who is not their own, but needs love and care just the same as all other children. While we know that parenting is the most important job in the world, at times it can also be the most difficult! Everyone’s experience is unique and there is no manual the covers all the ups and downs of being a parents. For fosterers, they care for children who come into care feeling vulnerable and sometimes traumatised. They need to be cared for by people who have an understanding of a child’s emotional, intellectual and cultural needs, have empathy and patience, have the ability to give praise and build self-esteem and have resilience in order to meet the challenges of fostering a child.  Communication and listening skills are also important in building strong relationships. These are qualities that exist in us all as parents. The chances are you will know some foster carers and they are no different from you and me. They come in all shapes and sizes and are truly representative of society as a whole. Children can come into care for a whole variety of reasons, but the one common theme is that for some reason their parents, who love them, are unable to provide them with enough care to meet their needs. This is where foster carers play a vital role in caring for children who need alternative care.  In the past in Ireland children whose parents could not adequately care for them were placed in residential institutions. Thankfully those days are gone and Ireland is one of the leading countries in the world in terms of percentages of children who are in foster care. Approximately 96% of children in care are in foster care with 4% placed in residential care.  In Ireland the care system is totally dependent on having enough foster carers to meet and support vulnerable children. This means that there is always a need for foster carers. To support foster carers enable the child in care to thrive and to ensure money is not a barrier, a weekly allowance to cover all costs is provided for the carer. Social work support is provided separately for both the child and the foster carer to help the carers, their family and the child to settle in and grow. Training is provided before a thorough assessment is carried out and once approved by the Foster Care Committee on going training is provided by The Child and Family Agency. Often it is immensely rewarding for carers who provide a safe and secure home for children who have not experienced stability and security. If you are interested in knowing more about fostering go to www.fostering.ie, Freephone 1800 226 771 or email tusla.fostering@tusla.ie This article was contributed by Tusla Fostering Services. Tusla are a member of Parenting Limerick, a network of parenting and family support organisations. For more information on this and other topics go to www.loveparenting.ie. [...]
Keeping Your Cool when Things Heat up at Home
Keeping Your Cool when Things Heat up at HomeFebruary 10, 2022Home Life / Homepage DisplayWe all have those perfect family moments in our minds—the relaxed dinners where everyone shares the highs and lows of their day; the long country walks full of laughter and rosy cheeks; the cosy movie nights cuddled up on the couch. But, the reality of day to day life can sometimes be quite different. Early mornings, hectic family schedules, traffic delays, colds and flus, financial worries and the normal stresses and strains of growing up, can mean those lovely moments can quickly become fraught with tension, and we can all teeter on the edge of losing our temper. This can also happen to our children who have to manage early mornings, long days at schools, lots of social interactions and activities and sometimes the pressure of holding it all together. When they finally get home and in to a safe space, they may find they need to let the stress and strain out somehow. So, in a family, where everyone might be feeling some stress after busy days, it’s easy to see how the whole enterprise can unravel: tempers flare and your simple evening is full of stress; the homework is not done; the dinner is not cooked and you cannot even imagine how you will ever get them to bed. Below are a few ways to get your evenings back on track when the strains of the day threaten to derail them. Tune it to your own feelings. Learn to recognise your own emotions and the signs that you are starting to feel really stressed. Think about what causes you stress-is it the pressure to get the dinner on the table? Is it your children arguing or whinging? Is it other stresses of work, finances or extended family are having a really negative effect on you? Find ways to manage them. If the rush in the evening is causing the stress, try to find some practical ways to reduce it. Can you meal plan, so making dinner is a matter of simply reheating on some days? Can the children help you with some of the preparation? If you are under other stress from family members, finances or other worries, think about how you can take practical steps to address them. Even writing down a plan can help relieve some of the worry and give you space to focus on positive time with your family. Tune in to the feelings of your children and other family members. We have all let our own bad moods or bad feelings affect how we view another’s actions or words. Try to remember, however, that children are rarely trying to anger or annoy us on purpose. Usually, when they are upset, angry, irritable or defiant, it is because they are trying to tell us something or expressing a need. Try to tune in to your child and learn when they are most likely to have these negative feelings. Does your child need to run around outside before they can focus on their homework? Do they need some quiet time alone? Are they worried or anxious about an upcoming test or an issue with friends? Instead of reacting, take a deep breath, think about what they might be feeling and why, and calmly speak to them. They may not immediately respond, but know that staying with them in a calm and loving way will help them to manage their feelings. Forgive and Restore No parent or child is perfect. If you find that things do go wrong, be kind to yourself and your children. Give them a kiss goodnight; tell them you love them; forgive yourself and try again tomorrow. This article was contributed by a member of Parenting Limerick. Parenting Limerick is a network of parenting and family support organisations.    [...]
Supporting Families Online: #TalkListenLearn
Supporting Families Online: #TalkListenLearnFebruary 3, 2022Home Life / Homepage DisplayNext Tuesday, 8th February, is Safer Internet Day 2022. The online world is an important part of life for children and young people. Having regular and open conversations with them about their lives online is vital to ensuring that they have a safe and positive experience. With Safer Internet Day coming up this February 8th, it’s an ideal time to check in with your teen, but for many parents it can be difficult to know where to start or how to begin the conversation. Nobody understands the online world of children and teenagers better than their fellow young people! Based on their own online experiences, these Talking Points have been co-created by Irish teenagers to help parents approach the conversation in a way that will encourage your child or teen to open up about their life online! The conversation starters will help you to get a better understanding of what your child is doing online, why, and how you can support them. Talking to them about their life online, just as you would about their offline life, will make it more likely that they will feel comfortable coming to you if they encounter anything that bothers them online. Below are some talking points for parents created by Irish Teens to help you talk with confidence to your Teen about their life online: 1. Who is your favourite influencer on social media or what is your favourite online game?  Starting off with an easier question about what they like online will make your children or teenager feel comfortable and can be used as a springboard to a deeper conversation. What did you think of the recent story about [sports team/celebrity/influencer that your teenager is interested in] ? Talking about recent news events or trending topics online can be a natural way of easing into a conversation with your teenager and finding common ground.  Can you show me how your favourite app/game works?  Showing an interest in what your child or teenager likes to do online will encourage them to be more open with you, and will help you learn and have a better understanding of what they like to do online. How do you stay connected with your friends online? The social aspect of being online is very important to young people. It allows them to stay connected with their friends, and also to connect with communities with shared interests right around the world. This will help you to understand the social element for your child, and to be able to support them to have a safe and positive experience. What rules do you think we should have in place about using the internet. It is helpful for families to have rules around internet use and guidelines around expected behaviour online. By allowing your teen to have a say in developing rules this can lead to a better understanding and acceptance of guidelines. It’s always helpful to revisit rules. #TalkListenLearn For Safer Internet Day 2022 Webwise is encouraging families to #TalkListenLearn. A great starting point is the Webwise Parents Hub (webwise.ie/parents) where you’ll find the new Parents Guide to a Better internet resource and lots more helpful tips and advice. Webwise are also encouraging families to have a chat using the topic generator – a helpful tool generator to begin open conversations free from judgement or criticism. Available here: https://talklistenlearn.webwise.ie Webwise Parents Online Safety Checklist GET INFORMED Get started by visiting webwise.ie/parents. You’ll find expert advice, how to guides, explainers and helpful talking points for parents. HAVE THE CHAT Have regular conversations with your child on the important things to look out for online and any potential risks. AGREE RULES Agree on a clear set of rules in your home about internet use and around screentime. Remember the importance of a healthy balance! ASK FOR HELP Reassure your child that they can always come talk to you about anything that comes up online. LEAD BY EXAMPLE Do as you say! Modelling behaviour is the most powerful way you can influence your child’s behaviour! JOIN IN! The internet is a great resource for children! Play your child’s favourite computer game and discover the online world together. Visit the Webwise.ie/Parents Hub for expert online safety advice, explainer guides, talking points and more. This article was contributed by Webwise on behalf of Parenting Limerick. Parenting Limerick is a network of parenting and family support organisations. Webwise is the Irish Internet Safety Awareness Centre. Go to www.webwise.ie for more information. [...]
Up Snakes and Down Ladders!
Up Snakes and Down Ladders!January 27, 2022Homepage Display / Quality TimeIt might surprise you to know that playing board games provide numerous benefits for our children. Board games make learning fun because children don’t even realise they are learning. Younger children can learn about colours, shapes, patterns, and maths and as many games involve moving pieces around the board, hand eye coordination benefits too. Patience, waiting, turn taking and team work are all skills that children get to practice and master playing board games.  Language develops, not just from the vocabulary and spelling involved in the game but from reading the instructions or game cards and more importantly from the chats we have while playing together. Who knew spelling could be fun? Try a game of Scrabble with your children and see how learning and fun fit snuggly together.  For older children we know strategy games have a positive impact on the development of the frontal lobe of their brains. Playing games improves memory, cognitive and communication skills. The planning, organising, remembering information, strategic thinking, problem solving and decision making involved in games are skills that can be applied throughout life. Children gain information about real life from games that involve factual information. They get insight into how other people think or see the world.  Playing games together gives parents the opportunity to model, coach and encourage the social skills and behaviours that will make everyday life easier and have a benefit throughout your child’s life. Notice and praise the behaviours you want to see more of such as staying calm when frustrated and waiting patiently. Board games can help children to get along better as they have structure and rules. Structured games can be an asset for children that have difficulty playing with or beside another child. Everyone has a turn and generally there is a specific way to do things. But remember games are fun and you can shake thing up by changing some of the rules. Our family always played Up Snakes and Down Ladders because there was a long snake’s head at 99 and no one wanted to almost win and land right back at the bottom of the board. Children under the age of 7 years are not developmentally ready to understand game rules so keep it simple when young children are playing. Although games by their nature are competitive, board games also require us to cooperate and this builds a sense of connection that brings families together. As you play, you chat, share ideas and opinions and build family bonds. Often things get discussed and decided that may have proven difficult in other family settings. All players are equal and parents are not in charge so children get to see their parents in a new light creating a different balance. Playing together creates a relaxed fun atmosphere that encourages communication and builds trust that lasts beyond the end of the game. The fun we have together laughing and joking causes our bodies to release chemicals known as endorphins, the happy hormones that lowers our blood pressure and reduces stress.  Research tells us that positive feelings and thoughts can boost our immune system which is something we all really need at the moment. Avoiding interruptions and having no screens, TV or phones can help keep all of us focused on the game! Sticking with it until the end lengthens children’s attention span and they learn to stay at things that are enjoyable but can also be difficult and disappointing. If children are not used to playing board games start small with short, easy games. Save the ones that can go on longer, like Monopoly, until you have all adjusted to playing together. Monopoly, one of my childhood regulars gave great enjoyment but also caused some family disagreement because my brother, always the banker, embezzled! Interestingly, he became an accountant so perhaps playing a financial based game contributed to his adult career.  This Christmas, like many other families, we were apart so I sent him the Limerick version of Monopoly as a reminder of past family times.  Although I did include a note for my nephew suggesting they never allow Dad to be the banker! Some children and even some adults have difficulty loosing! Games help you coach your child’s coping skills and their ability to manage their disappointment when things don’t go their way. Be careful not to fall into the trap of always letting your child win. They soon see through this and it denies them the chance to learn from small failures. Better to praise their efforts and help them learn ways to succeed the next time you play. Encourage them to congratulate the winner and praise their efforts bearing in mind that loosing is a skill we all struggle with. Remember most games benefit from the occasional treat. Bringing some sharing food to the table is enjoyable and helps limit distractions. Popcorn or a pizza to share fit the bill nicely. Consider setting a regular slot for your family game night making it a ritual and giving you all the chance to share each other’s company. Playing board games together is fun and can have a positive impact on the wellbeing of your entire family. This article was contributed by Tusla PPFS, a member of Parenting Limerick. Parenting Limerick is a network of parenting and family support organisations.  [...]
Baby & Toddler Groups Expectations
Baby & Toddler Groups ExpectationsJanuary 15, 2022ToddlersThe expectations and realities of parenthood can be quite different. Plans for maternity or parental leave usually include leisurely days where yourself and your sleepy newborn will finally have the time to catch up with friends, household projects and all those other things that have been on the long finger for so long. There will be, without a doubt, plenty of those lazy, hazy days. There are also other days; the ones where a shower is like a gift from the gods and getting dressed feels like a major achievement. You realise that time isn’t your own because there’s a new (tiny) sheriff in town and that you haven’t had a conversation with a grown-up all day. This is where a local Parent and Baby/Toddler group can throw you a lifeline. As the name suggests, these groups benefit both parent/carer and child. While your baby or toddler has an opportunity to interact with babies of similar age and developmental stage, you can enjoy a chat with other parents/carers and pick up some very helpful information and tips from that peer group, as well as from the group leader. They provide a weekly space that has a subtle structure – for example, free play, craft activity, tidy-up, snack, story and song – and which allows both you and your child to meet friends, explore new things and learn. The group provides a weekly window, usually for 60-90 minutes, where you can meet with others who understand exactly where you are at this particular point of parenthood. Suggestions for dealing with sleepless nights, easing the pain of teething, sibling rivalry and finding time for yourself are generally always points of discussion. The sessions also provide a great opportunity to see developmental milestones in action. Your baby, for example, might be a newborn but there may be a mom with a 3-month old in the group, or a dad with a 9 month-old who is crawling. It’s fascinating to see what lies ahead and again, to pick up some ideas from other parents/carers. For some parents, grandparents and carers, the weekly catch-up and opportunity to learn about play or language development is enough. For others, the understated hand-holding and support makes them that bit more confident in their parenting role. Which ever you are, it doesn’t matter; if you are caring for a baby or toddler, these groups are a welcoming and supportive place for you. [...]
Encouraging Communication between parents and teenagers
Encouraging Communication between parents and teenagersDecember 16, 2021Homepage Display / TeenagersMost misunderstandings are usually because of poor communication. Communicating well between family members leads to less arguments which results in increased cooperation and stronger connection among parents and teenagers. To do this, it is important to invest time in building these relationships by spending time together, having conversations, listening to one another and being interested in their interests. As children begin to grow up and become teenagers, they start to develop their own sense of self and have their own ideas and beliefs. This can cause disagreements if these new ideas are very different to their parents and this can be difficult for parents to respond to. Children and teenagers like to test boundaries, although it’s a bit easier to influence small children to follow the rules, it is a lot harder to do this with adolescents. This is because teenagers are less likely to follow rules when they are not part of making or agreeing to the rules. As much as a parent wants to tell a teenager to do what they say or ask with no room for negotiation, this is unlikely to happen even if a parent thinks it does. Teenagers will most likely begin to lie or hold back the full truth because they believe their parent won’t understand nor see things from their perspective, despite parents trying to do the right thing by their children. In order for teenagers to follow rules, communication is key. For this to happen, teenagers need to be part of the decision making. They need to feel heard, understood and their feelings considered and as part of this, the parent needs to be heard, understood and their feelings taken into account as well. Whenever there are disagreements on anything between parents and teenagers. It is best to make time to have a conversation when everyone is calm. When everyone is calm, everyone can hear each other. Start with picking a good time, no distractions and when everyone is calm, ask the teenager to give their point of view without interruption no matter what is said. When finished, the parent can repeat what they have heard back to them to show the teenager have been listened to. Then, the parent has their say on what the issue is. Teenagers need to listen and not interrupt when the parent is speaking, also. For this communication to work well, everyone must be clear from the beginning that they must speak respectfully and one at a time. If anyone raises their voice, remind each other that the conversation can only continue if everyone speaks calmly to each other. If everyone cannot speak calmly then maybe it is best to postpone until everyone is calmer. If the conversation continues as an argument it is unlikely anything will be resolved. Once both parent and teenager have heard each other’s points of view, then it is time to come up with solutions. Let the teenager come up with them first without interruptions, followed by parent’s solutions and then try to reach an agreement. The key is to listen to each other’s view, see where the other is coming from and then try and figure out what works for both of you. Most disagreements can be resolved by having a calm discussion. Everyone wants to be heard and feel understood. It may take practice and perhaps learning how to be calm first. This is also teaching your teenager how to problem solve and deal with situations they dislike in a positive way. Once both have met in the middle and made an agreement, it is important to arrange a follow up conversation after a few days to see how the agreement is working for everyone. When making the agreement make sure a consequence is agreed in case the agreement is broken. Ask the teenager for their input on what the consequence should be. This way your teenager is making an informed choice if they decide not to follow the rules you both set together. They will know the consequence of their decision. Follow through on the consequence and discuss calmly why this has happened and try to make a new agreement. This may be difficult to get started with but keep communicating together calmly at all times and if that is challenging, then end the conversation until there is calm again. Top tips for Encouraging Communication. Set time aside Setting aside time every day to chat with your teenager without distractions will make a massive difference to your relationship. Asking “how was your day?” “How did the Maths test go?” or “the big match is on tonight, how do you think it will go?” shows your teen you are interested in them, their hobbies and their opinion is important to you. Remember it doesn’t have to be long- 10 minutes a day can make a big difference. Have fun together Make time to do fun activities together, whether it is a walk in the local park, watching TV series or sports, at home pamper sessions or cooking new recipes. It doesn’t have to be costly. Getting along with your teenager and having fun can improve relationship and reduce arguments. Actively Listen To truly listen to someone it is important to avoid interrupting. This can be difficult when the topic of conversation is something you might disagree with. However, it is important to listen and hear what your teenager has to say, no matter what. This shows them how a two way conversation plays out when both parties disagree. Parents of teenagers will often hear the phrase “You don’t understand me” or “You never listen to me”. Actively listening responds to this because you can begin to truly understand your teenagers point of view when there is no interruption on the parents part. Stay calm In order to actively listen well, staying calm is required. No matter what has happened or how much you disagree. The problem will not be solved if there is an argument. Keep a ‘talking’ tone of voice at all times while you both discuss the situation. It is important that your teenager keeps a ‘talking’ tone to their voice, too. If voices are raised and not going back to a respectful talking tone, then the conversation must be postponed until there is calm again. This is ok. Next time insist on respectful talking voices at all times. Problem solve To figure out a solution to a problem, hear each other’s opinion on the matter first, then come up with ideas to solve it starting with your teenager. Next the parent can give their solutions then move on to choosing the best one you can both agree on. Follow up Always have follow up conversations on what has been agreed to make sure everyone is happy and doing what is agreed. Talking to and taking an interest in their world when things are going well provides a solid basis for solving issues during the tough times. This article was contributed by Jillian Gillick, Family Support Worker with Respond, a member of Parenting Limerick. Parenting Limerick is a network of parenting and family support organisations.          [...]
Let’s Play Pretend!
Let’s Play Pretend!December 9, 2021Homepage Display / playHave you ever watched your little one pick-up a block, put it to their ear and babble into it? Your child is using this block as a phone, this is pretend or imaginative play! One of the many ways young children learn about the world around them is through pretend play, where they have the chance to take on different roles and act out different situations and scenarios. They also get to practice new skills over and over until they have perfected them. Pretend play has many benefits and children soon discover that they can become anyone or anything they want just by pretending! Have you ever stopped to listen to a young child as they play with their toys or friends? You will hear words and phrases that you never realised they knew, sometimes you will even hear your own voice as children can do perfect imitations of mums, dads and teachers. Children learn new words through imaginary play and start to understand the power that words can have in re enacting a story or pretending to be someone else. Pretend play also helps children develop their social and emotional skills. While it is normal for young children to see the world from their own perspective, as they grow older and play with friends, they start to develop an understanding of other peoples’ feelings. In pretend play, they can become different characters and walk in the shoes of others. This allows them to experience and feel what others do and they begin to understand the feelings of other people, helping them to develop empathy.  Participating in imaginary play situations with children allows parents to explore some confusing or scary life issues that their children may be experiencing. This can help them to come to terms with life events in a safe way. Pretend play is a normal way for children to figure out personal life events that happen around them, such as an illness or death of a family member or the separation or absence of a parent. It can also be used to prepare them for something in their future such as a stay in hospital, starting school or starting a new activity. Acting out what might happen with you is a safe way for your child to explore and prepare for different scenarios. It allows the parent to name and acknowledge the feelings associated with these situations and provide the necessary emotional scaffolding their child will need to succeed.   Children get lots of opportunity to solve problems in pretend play. Whether they are building a structure to play in, or figuring out who will play the different characters, children are learning to negotiate, cooperate and think flexibly with one another. They also learn and practice lots of different social skills such as having a conversation, taking turns, waiting and asking for help. Imaginary play allows children to learn about themselves and their world. They are figuring out what they like and dislike, what their interests are, and what they can and can’t do. When they play different characters in play, children are making sense of what they see around them, of situations and of the roles people play in their lives. This is why a young child playing with their doll often mimics the role of carers in their lives through feeding, changing and holding the doll. Simple everyday objects you have at home will support your little one to think more creatively in their play. For example, a cardboard box can be a pirate ship, a car, a spaceship, or a house. It can be anything they need it to be. When engaging children’s imaginations the sky is the limit! Games and activities such as building forts under the kitchen table, going wild as cowboys and indians, playing doctors and nurses and drinking tea at teddy bears picnics have endless possibilities so go play pretend! Top Tips to Encourage Pretend Play: Position yourself face-to-face with your baby, sing songs and rhymes like incy wincy spider or patty cake, inviting your baby to take part by pretending to be spider or the baker. Keep it simple.Don’t introduce too many pretend ideas at once. Children love repetition and learn by repeating, so they will likely enjoy practicing their pretend actions again and again. Create a prop box with objects to encourage your child to engage in pretend play. Include old clothes, shoes, scarves, hats, cardboard boxes, blankets, kitchen utensils, dolls and stuffed animals. Get involved and role model for your child. Role play up and coming events or situations that your child may be unsure of playing out what might happen. This will support your child to become more confident with new situations. Tell your favourite stories and invite your child to recreate the story with their own idea. Prompt ideas by asking questions like, ‘what happened next?’ Join in the play. When you join in with your child in pretend play it gives them more opportunities to learn because it allows for more interaction and conversation within play. This article was contributed ABC Start Right, a member of Parenting Limerick. Parenting Limerick is a network of parenting and family support organisations.  [...]
1, 2, 3 Rhymes for You and Me
1, 2, 3 Rhymes for You and MeNovember 25, 2021Homepage Display / Learning to TalkDid you know that last week was Nursery Rhyme Week? Over the next few weeks we will be looking at the benefit of nursery rhymes with your little one. Nursery rhymes aren’t only a fun way to spend time with your child, they have a lot more to offer.  They are an important pillar of children’s development and their value to language and learning can not be underestimated. Nursery rhymes teach children to pronounce words and increase their vocabulary. They help to build memory, understand concepts, and teach patterns and numbers. They expand children’s imagination and creativity, develop humour, and can be a great group activity. Nursery rhymes are familiar and can provide comfort in difficult situations. Feedback from the original nursery rhyme initiative has been very positive and encouraged parents to read and sing more with their children.  In 2016 the Limerick Nursery Rhyme Initiative, a joint project involving the West Limerick Primary Health Care Project for Travellers, the Limerick City Traveller Health Advocacy Project and the HSE CH03 Speech and Language Therapy Services, came together to produce a beautiful nursery rhyme book called 1,2,3 Rhymes for You and Me. The nursery rhymes in the book were chosen by members of the Travelling community in Limerick City and County. The book consists of eight nursery rhymes, because research has shown that if your child knows eight nursery rhymes by the age of four, they will be better readers by the time they are eight years old. The eight rhymes and the drawings in the book were selected because they take into account Traveller values and culture, such as family, horses, faith, home and being outdoors, and show them in a positive light, which the group felt was important. Earlier this year West Limerick Primary Health Care Project for Travellers teamed up with the Social Inclusion and Community Activation Programme (SICAP), both programmes of West Limerick Resources. In a collaborative project, they developed the 1,2,3 Rhymes for You and Me book into a video series. Each rhyme was developed into a video featuring the reading of the rhyme and a craft activity. Children, mothers, fathers, and grandparents took part in the videos and made each video unique and enjoyable. The primary health care workers talk about the benefits of nursery rhymes and give tips on how to read the rhymes with your children. Building on the success of the book, the video series aims to put a new twist on the initiative and making it accessible to a wider audience, including migrant communities. Visuals and audio in the video help reducing literacy and language barriers and more families will be able to enjoy the nursery rhymes. Nursery rhymes exist in all languages and cultures and many countries share the same rhymes, which makes it a great medium for group activity and is inclusive of children from different cultural backgrounds. Are you interested to find out more? You can find the nursery rhymes videos on the West Limerick Resources YouTube Channel or follow us on Facebook 1, 2, 3 Rhymes for You and Me. Top Tips Parents can do a lot to prevent speech and language delays such as playing with children, speaking to them, reading to them and singing rhymes and songs If your child knows eight nursery rhymes by the time they are four years old they will be better readers at school If you have concerns about your child’s speech and language get help early by speaking to your GP, Public Health Nurse or the Speech & Language Therapist in your local health centre Speech and Language therapy takes time and patience If you do you have an appointment with a Speech and Language Therapist, it is important to attend and do the homework given by the therapist with your child to see progress. This article was contributed Stefanie Jaeger Liston in West Limerick Resources. West Limerick Resources is a member of Parenting Limerick, a network of parenting and family support organisations.    [...]

Supporting Parents

Being a Parent is the Most Important Job in the world

Ages & Stages

What’s Happening?

family-at-home-preparing-meal-in-kitchen-together-pn2kd45

Local Services

family-at-home-preparing-meal-in-kitchen-together-pn2kd45

DATE_LABEL

  • Today

    0

  • WEEK_RANGE_LABEL

  • DAY_LABEL

  • MONTH_LABEL

  • YEAR_LABEL

  • Agenda

  • Month

  • Week

  • Day

  • Grid

  • Box Grid

  • Map

    • Agenda

    • Month

    • Week

    • Day

    • Grid

    • Box Grid

    • Map

    Calendar
    Category
      Organizer
        Location

        Look for more

        -

        -

        -

        -

        -

        -

        -

        -

        -

        -

        -

        -

        -

        -

        -

        -

        -

        -

        -

        -

        -

        DN_T

        DN_T

        DN_T

        DN_T

        DN_T

        DN_T

        DN_T

        DN_T

        DN_T

        DN_T

        DN_T

        DN_T

        DN_T

        DN_T

        DN_T

        DN_T

        DN_T

        DN_T

        DN_T

        DN_T

        DN_T

        DN_T

        DN_T

        DN_T

        DN_T

        DN_T

        DN_T

        DN_T

        DN_T

        DN_T

        DN_T

        DN_T

        DN_T

        DN_T

        DN_T

        DN_T

        DN_T

        DN_T

        DN_T

        DN_T

        DN_T

        DN_T

        -

        -

        -

        -

        -

        -

        -

        -

        -

        -

        -

        -

        -

        -

        -

        -

        -

        -

        -

        -

        -

        DN_T

        DN_T

        DN_T

        DN_T

        DN_T

        DN_T

        DN_T

        You have no events for this day

        Look for more

        You have no events for this month

        Look for more

        You have no events for this month

        You have no events

        stec_replace_image
        stec_replace_icon

        stec_replace_summary

        stec_replace_desc_short
        0d 0h 0m 0s
        Expired
        In Progress

        stec_replace_location

        stec_replace_timespan

      • stec_replace_icon

        stec_replace_summary

        stec_replace_date

        Reminder
      • Create an event

        Click to submit your own event

        Title

        Description (optional)

        Short Description (optional)

        Image (optional)

        Location (optional)

        Website URL (optional)

        Calendar

        Icon

        Category

        Color. By default will use the calendar color

        Starts On

        From

        Ends On

        To

        All Day

        Repeat Event

        Repeat gap

        Repeat by day

        Repeat Ends On

        Search Keywords

        Counter

        Your E-mail

        Notes to the reviewer (optional)

      • stec_replace_summary

        Awaiting approval

        Cancel
        Cancel
      • stec_replace_tags
        Invited
        stec_replace_icon
        stec_replace_summary stec_replace_short_desc
        Expired
        In Progress
        stec_replace_guest_name stec_replace_product_name stec_replace_location stec_replace_date
        stec_replace_image
        stec_replace_icon
        stec_replace_date_big
        stec_replace_date
        stec_replace_tags
        stec_replace_summary
        stec_replace_short_desc
        • Event Info

        • Location

        • Schedule

        • Guests

        • Attendance

        • Forecast

        • Comments

        stec_replace_tags

        stec_replace_summary

        stec_replace_description
        • stec_replace_title
          Organizer of stec_replace_event
          stec_replace_about
          stec_replace_social
        Visit Website
        • 0

          days

        • 0

          hours

        • 0

          minutes

        • 0

          seconds

        • Attend

        • Decline

        Event expired

        Event is in progress

        Attachments

        Import to Google Calendar

        Location

        stec_replace_location

        Get Directions

        Get Directions

        Could not find route!

        Details

        stec_replace_details

        No schedule

        stec_replace_date stec_replace_time
        stec_replace_title
        stec_replace_desc
        stec_replace_avatar
          stec_replace_social

        stec_replace_name

        stec_replace_about

        You are invited to this event!

        • Attend

        • Decline

        • stec_replace_name
            stec_replace_status

          stec_replace_name

        Weather data is currently not available for this location

        Weather Report

        Today stec_replace_today_date

        stec_replace_today_icon_div

        stec_replace_current_summary_text

        stec_replace_current_temp °stec_replace_current_temp_units

        Wind stec_replace_current_wind stec_replace_current_wind_units stec_replace_current_wind_direction

        Humidity stec_replace_current_humidity %

        Feels like stec_replace_current_feels_like °stec_replace_current_temp_units

        Forecast

        Date

        Weather

        Temp

        stec_replace_date

        stec_replace_icon_div

        stec_replace_min / stec_replace_max °stec_replace_temp_units

        stec_replace_5days

        Next 24 Hours

        Powered by Forecast.io